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Peyton McKenzie

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Drake and 21 Savage have previously worked together to make hit songs like “Sneakin” and “Knife Talk.” Their long-awaited collaborative album “Her Loss” was released on Nov. 4. It seemed like fans who follow the duo online have been waiting for new music after their song “Jimmy Cooks” debuted at number one on the Billboard 100 in June.

The rollout for the album was a bit peculiar as fake interviews and magazine covers divided the hip-hop community. The promotions consisted of a made-up Vogue magazine cover and a CGI interview with radio personality Howard Stern. The album cover simply features the face of model Qui Yasuka, which was criticized online for being random and unlike a traditional album cover. However, it didn’t seem to matter after millions of people on streaming services waited for the midnight release and got what they were waiting for.

The rollout for the album was a bit peculiar as fake interviews and magazine covers divided the hip-hop community. The promotions consisted of a made-up Vogue magazine cover and a CGI interview with radio personality Howard Stern. The album cover simply features the face of model Qui Yasuka, which was criticized online for being random and unlike a traditional album cover. However, it didn’t seem to matter after millions of people on streaming services waited for the midnight release and got what they were waiting for.

“Her Loss” not only lived up to but, exceeded the massive expectations that came with it. Drake was criticized for his lackluster performance on his last two albums “Certified Lover Boy” and “Honestly, Nevermind.” The former was an industry-driven project that was seen as lazy, while “Honestly, Nevermind” was an awful attempt at a dance album. Drake seemed to hear this feedback as on “Her Loss” he seems to have the hunger and desire to create like he’s trying to get his first record deal again, as he and 21 Savage dropped what seems like a Grammy’s Album of Best Rap Album contender.

From the first track “Rich Flex,” Drake is once again rapping like he has something to prove. Although 21 Savage sits off to the side for what seems like the first half of the album, his ad-libs and verses provide the perfect complement to Drake’s softly spoken performances. Whether it’s the calm track “Hours In Silence” or the more traditional beat-based rap song “Broke Boys,” it’s apparent that this album has no songs that would warrant a skip.

Although rapper Lil Yachty does provide support in the track “BackOutsideBoyz,” the only feature on the album is from Travis Scott in “Pussy and Millions.” Scott delivers one of his more traditional autotune-filled performances on the track, but he still managed to fit right in with the steady flow of the album.

I was pleased to hear Drake and 21 sample the song “One More Time” by Daft Punk on the track “Circo Loco.” The sample perfectly fits with the flow and rhyme scheme as it is definitely one of the best tracks on the album.

In a solo track, 21 Savage recorded “3AM In Glenwood,” which also follows the calm and easy-going theme of the album. In his most prominent role on the album, 21 Savage delivered yet another great performance on his growing resume of well-done verses.

The album did not come without its share of disses of other artists.

The line on “Circo Loco,” “Linking with the opps, bitch / I did that for J Prince” refers to Drake and Ye’s meet-up in 2021 for the Free Larry Hoover Benefit Concert, which saw the two seemingly end their beef and perform together.

Collaboration albums are usually forgotten in a rapper’s discography unless it has a massive impact like “Watch The Throne” or “What a Time to Be Alive.” The album already looks like it will be here to stay for a long time. Not every track is a perfect 10, but there are no songs that could be considered bad or below average.

Overall, “Her Loss” is on the same level as established album of the year contenders such as Kendrick Lamar’s “Mr. Morale and the Big Steppers” and Pusha T’s “It’s Almost Dry.” The quality that Drake and 21 Savage brought to this project has not been seen in a collaborative hip-hop album in a very long time. In the next five or so years, it may go down as a classic album in the discographies of both Drake and 21 Savage.